Regional Security Challenges

Korea Initiative

This is a major program to enhance the teaching of Korea-related subjects, including language and security issues at Georgia Tech. The goals of the program include the following:

  • Enhance the current Northeast Asia program of The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs with:
    1. Korean Language classes in the School of Modern Languages;
    2. classes in Korean security issues, culture, history, and economics;
  • Reach out to the second and third generation Korean-American population in the Southeastern United States to provide opportunities to learn about their special relationship with the United States and the significance of Korea on the world stage;
  • Provide professional mid-career education and training to U.S. government graduate students in Northeast Asian Security Studies;

The Korea Initiative ensures regional pre-eminence of Georgia Tech as a center for Northeast Asian security studies and security studies. The Korea Initiative consists of:

  • Korea Speaker Series: Funded generously by the Korea Foundation, a lecture series focusing on Korea-related subjects and featuring Korean experts from around the world is offered every other year.
  • Korea Conferences: On alternate years, conferences focusing on Korea-related subjects are held, also generously funded by the Korea Foundation.
  • Community Outreach: Educating the greater Atlanta community on Korean affairs is another aspect of the Korea Initiative.

More About the Korea Initiative

Limited Nuclear Weapons Free Zone – Northeast Asia (LNWFZ-NEA)

This project was initiated in 1991 as a Track II (unofficial) diplomatic effort to support cooperative security and joint denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula. It was later extended to include a broader set of regional stakeholders and concerned parties. Representatives from China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Argentina, Canada, Finland, France, Mongolia, the United States, and (in 2006) North Korea meet annually to discuss how a regional nuclear weapons free zone might be achieved. A draft treaty has been produced, and there are continued efforts to produce an agreement acceptable to all concerned stakeholders. The work toward a LNWFZ-NEA has been organized into three “baskets” which consist of:

  • the structure and details of the zone;
  • confidence building measures needed to achieve consensus;
  • incentives necessary to ensure continued commitment to the zone

2007 Tokyo Plenary

Track II Nuclear Diplomacy

The Center works to advance Track II efforts on nuclear nonproliferation.

North Korea:  Significant efforts have been advanced to engage the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in a dialogue about its nuclear weapons program. The Center has hosted meetings in New York and Atlanta between representatives of the DPRK mission to the United Nations, personnel from the US State Department, and key personnel from academia, think tanks, and the policymaking community.

North Korean Officials visit CISTP – December 2006

Some photos from the International House...

Dr. Taehyun Kim with some International House Students
Dr. Taehyun Kim with some International House Students

Consul Lee Hee Chul with some International House Students
Consul Lee Hee Chul with some International House Students

Dr. Kirk Bowman, Dr. Taehyun Kim and Consul Lee Hee Chul
Dr. Kirk Bowman, Dr. Taehyun Kim and Consul Lee Hee Chul

Two International House Students
Two International House Students

Program Director

Adam N. Stulberg

Phone: 404.385.0090
E-mail: adam.stulberg [at] inta.gatech.edu

Affiliated Faculty

John W. Garver

Professor of International Affairs
Phone: 404.894.6846
E-mail: john.garver [at] inta.gatech.edu

Lawrence Rubin

Assistant Professor of International Affairs
Phone: 404.385.4081
E-mail: lawrence.rubin [at] inta.gatech.edu

Adam N. Stulberg

Associate Professor of International Affairs & Co-Director, Center for International Strategy, Technology & Policy (CISTP)
Phone: 404.385.0090
E-mail: adam.stulberg [at] inta.gatech.edu